Hitting a Fastball in Baseball – Is Vision Involved?

“Hitting is Timing” was what Warren Spahn said. The Batting Stance Guy shows you just how important or unimportant stance is, depending on how you look at it. 

The vision factor kicks in the second the pitcher’s wind-up commences. The visual system of the brain takes cues from where the image of the pitchers wind-up lands on the back surface of the eye (the retina). When the image of the wind-up hits the retinas of the eyes, the brain starts calculating based on the batters observation of (1) where the pitcher’s eyes are focused, (2) the speed with which the wind-up occurs and (3) the angle of his shoulders in relation to the rest of his body.

We have all heard of binocular vision and this is where both eyes seeing together is gives us our best ability to judge one object’s distance from another. The better our binocular vision the better we can hit the baseball whether it is little league to the majors.

At the point of release of the ball from the pitchers hand, the brain takes the image of the ball and calculates where the image of the pitch might fall on the retina.  At this point, the eye locks onto the ball with the center of the retina and now is the time the pitcher’s visual brain is determining whether to strike at the ball assuming where it might come over the home plate.  The brain uses these cues to determine what plane to place the swinging bat.  The brain determines timing when hitting a baseball. 

The back of the brain where visual images are interpreted by all of us when we think we see something is the time our visual motor control system kicks in telling the batter if he should swing.

Signals are sent to the fingers, hands wrists, forearms, elbows and shoulders as well as to the feet, legs, hips and torso for movement that will align the bat along the trajectory of the ball. The goal is to have the bat end up in the same plane as the ball as the ball crosses the plate. The key to success in hitting the ball is as little head motion as possible.When the head moves, the image of the trajectory of the projectile (ball) shifts, necessitating a micro-second recalculation. A micro-second too late, and STRIKE! 

www.TheEyewearGallery.com   Dr.Warren Johnson/Dr. Burt Bodan 901-763-2020

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How can I hit that baseball?

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About Eyewear Gallery

Eyewear Gallery was established 30 years ago and our office likes to write about many topics that are related to eyecare, glasses and stories that we hope you enjoy. We write about your vision, health and educational facts as well as some fun information. We pride ourselves in medical eyecare and designer eyewear and have received the Peoples Choice Award more than once. We have designer frames such as Lunor, Tiffany, Oliver Peoples and Tom Ford. We also have non designer eyewear and cater to all ages. We stock alot of sunglasses such as Oakley, Wiley X, Costa del Mar, Ray Ban and Maui Jim for sports and outdoor fun. Eyewear Gallery is also known as one of the few Custom Sports Sunglass providers in the USA in both prescription and non prescription. Please visit our website www.EyewearGallery.com Thanks for visiting and following our blogs.
This entry was posted in Baseball eye exams Memphis, Baseball eyes, Dr. Burt Bodan Optometrist Memphis Tennesee, Dr. Warren Johnson Eyecare Specialist Memphis Tennessee, eye doctor memphis,tennessee, Eyewear Gallery Memphis Tennessee, Little league baseball Memphis, Medical Optometrists, Memphis Baseball, Memphis Baseball Pitcher, Memphis Best Eye Care Specialist, Memphis Redbirds, Oakley Sunglasses, Optometrists, Opticians, Optical, Ray Ban Sunglasses, Retina Memphis, vision improvement, visual Memphis and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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