How iPads could help ‘blind’ children to see!

IPads and Blindness in Children with CVI

Children living with severe vision problems could transform the way they communicate simply by using an iPad, researchers say.
A team from the University of Kansas gave the tablet computers to a group of children with a cortical visual impairment (CVI).
The severe neurological disorder results from brain damage which prevents them from interpreting visual information, making them essentially ‘blind.’
‘Every single child was enthralled with the iPad. Children that typically didn’t look at people, didn’t respond with objects or responded in a very repetitious fashion, were absolutely glued to the iPad. It was an amazing experience.’
Professor Saunders, who works with children with CVI to help them develop language skills, said that traditionally such children work with therapists and parents using a light box.
This is because children with CVI have an easier time seeing lights and objects in high contrast.
‘Someone with a severe CVI will spend a lot of time looking at lights,’ Saunders said.
With its bright screen, the iPad replicates a light box – but its interactivity, sound and color are a great deal more engaging to the children with CVI.
‘We were using some very simple infant applications,’ said Saunder.
‘One was called ‘Baby Finger,’ where you just touch the screen, and sounds and images and colored shapes appear on the white background.
‘So, in many ways, it was similar to a light box except for instead of black and white, there were bright colors. http://www.TheEyewearGallery.com Dr. Warren Johnson/ Dr. Burt Bodan http://www.yelp.com/biz/eyewear-gallery-memphis-2 http://www.facebook.com/EyewearGallery, http://twitter.com/eyeweargallery , https://eyeweargallery.wordpress.com/ , http://www.linkedin.com/pub/warren-johnson/12/797/b44

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